1.1 Growth Science Pillar 1: Iterative Experimentation

Meme: Never stop testing, and your growth will never stop improving.

The origins of growth science could be traced back to David Ogilvy, one of the most well known ad men of the twentieth century, who proclaimed back in 1963, “Never stop testing, and your advertising will never stop improving.” Ogilvy’s statement embodies two important concepts–continually test and improve–that have paved the way to modern growth science.

The idea that advertising is not a static creation is critically important because challenges one to continuously improve tactics. Although this philosophy was popularized in advertising it is just as relevant in product development, operations, and even sales. Since the 1960’s some marketers have embraced this ethos by iteratively trying variations of tactics, channels and messaging. Moreover, the practice of iteratively implementing improvements has become more commonplace in other business functions such as product development, customer support, and sales. However, It’s not enough to keep trying different tactics and implementations.

The second key concept that Ogilvy proposed is actually testing new variations and improvements by carefully measuring associated outcomes. Once again, this practice is not just limited to marketing activities, and one can test variations of product implementation, operations, and sales. It’s not surprising that many business leaders have adopted both iterative experimentation and rigorous testing across business functions, and it’s now just as common to test variations of product design (particularly in the digital realm) as it is to test different advertising messages.

This paradigm shift has been supported by an ever burgeoning ecosystem of data collection and analysis tools that have allowed companies to track key performance indicators for new customer acquisition, such as click-through rates on online and email marketing, as well as for engagement and retention of existing customers. Now, one can easily test variations to marketing emails or to webpage designs to see which ones lead to the greatest gains in key metrics such as the total number of new sign ups or daily active users.

What was once driven entirely by intuition can now be informed by experimentation and testing. Leaders across marketing, product development, and operations are forming hypotheses and conducting experiments to see which tactics yield the most positive results. This rigorous methodology is the first pillar of growth science and underlies the entire field allowing us to call it a “science.”

What is shocking is that after more than half a century, most marketers still do not make data-driven decisions according to a survey conducted by Google in 2017.  I can empathize with those that do not put this philosophy into practice. While the field has burgeoned, it has also become a lot more difficult to navigate. There are now countless tools that allow people to experiment with marketing and product design. The scope of growth science has also greatly expanded across disciplines–the second pillar of growth science– from marketing to product implementation and operations. The application of this methodology has also expanded to include not only new customer acquisition but also to engagement and adoption. The optimization of the entire customer lifecycle is the third pillar of growth science.

We will cover the other two pillars of growth science in subsequent sections. Hopefully by explaining the three elements of growth science and providing a comprehensive guide, we can empower you to successfully employ growth science to supercharge your business.

 

Be sure to check back tomorrow for the next section: Growth Science Pillar 2: Optimization Across Disciplines! New sections of Growthzilla are published every weekday. 

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