1.2 Growth Science Pillar 2: Optimization Across Disciplines

Growth is multidisciplinary

While corporate structure continues to silo departments, growth has quickly become an interdisciplinary practice requiring functions such as marketing, product development, customer support, sales, and even logistics. The third pillar of growth science is employing all of these different functions to spur customer and revenue growth. It is important to recognize that growth isn’t just driven by marketing but rather by multiple functions that are interrelated and must work together to have a positive impact on the business.

Sean Ellis, who coined the term “growth hacking,” was hired at Dropbox right as the company had decided to open the product to the general public. The biggest driver of growth at Dropbox at that time was when the company created a referral program giving existing customers additional storage space if they got their friends to try the product. While the strategy and vision for this kind of initiative might be driven by marketing, implementation often relies on the product, such as a website or app, that makes it possible to send and track invites and to reward users. That means that this tactic relies on both marketing and product development functions, and the two teams must work closely together to successfully implement it.

Uber’s customer support is another example of how different functions within a company work together to affect growth. One of the first times that I used Uber, I requested a ride, and the driver never showed up to pick me up. What made things worse was that I cancelled my ride after waiting for a long time and was charged a cancellation fee. Needless to say, I was furious contemplated deleting the app. Uber could have easily lost me as a customer then, or at least I might have been more likely to use a competitor such as Lyft. However, Uber made it extremely easy to request that the cancellation charge be reversed. It took only a few taps of my finger, and the refund request was submitted. Not only that, I was granted the refund that same day. Uber was able to retain me as a customer through great product design and lightning fast customer service.

In many regards, job boards hint at the interdisciplinary nature of growth science, and you can often see postings for “growth hacker,” “growth manager,” “growth engineer,” and “head of growth.” These titles did not exist a decade ago, but now the demand for these kinds of roles is ballooning. Business leaders created roles such as  “growth manager” and “head of growth” because those responsible for these efforts needed to oversee across departments and traditional roles that focused on a narrow domain didn’t fit. What is critical to understand is businesses are better able to identify new strategies when they understand how all functions impact growth.

Be sure to check back tomorrow for the next section: Growth Science Pillar 3: Optimization Across the Entire Customer Lifecycle! New sections of Growthzilla are published every weekday.

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