2.4 Running Successful Growth Experiments

Sample Growth Objectives and Experiments

This post is a part of the Growthzilla Book series, which is an online draft of the print edition that will be available in 2018.

By utilizing experimentation to help us decide if changes to product, marketing, and operations are effective, we avoid having to rely solely on our intuition. Without experimentation, we would implement changes and hope that we’re right slightly more than half of the time. Rather than engineering growth, we would be relying on an art form, which would be dominated by a select few that had outstanding intuition such as Steve Jobs (or those who claim to have this level of intuition). Growth engineering would be inaccessible to the majority of us.

Experiments make growth accessible to nearly everyone because they follow systematic ways of testing hypotheses to reach specific outcomes and are not unlike experiments in the physical and social sciences. Admittedly, growth experiments are usually not as rigorous as in academia, but the fundamentals are still the same. Anyone that learns the basic experimentation methodology can lead successful growth development at their company. Of course, you will likely be more effective with greater experience and practice, but it’s important to learn strong fundamentals from the beginning.

In this section, we will review the key components of successful experimentation. The first step is understanding what are you trying to achieve with your experiment. Are you trying to improve how long users spend on your site or how quickly the can get their tasks done? Then we will consider how to measure whether or not the changes that you implement have successfully accomplished that objective, or not. Then we will discuss ways to create a sounds hypothesis about ways to reach your objective. Finally, we’ll review the nuts and bolts steps in running good experiments as well as gathering and analyzing results.

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2.3 Strategizing and Prioritizing Experiments

Growth Strategy Cycle

This post is part of the Growthzilla Book series, which is an online draft of the print edition that will be available in 2018.

When you model your business, you will likely find that there are many ways that you can potentially improve growth. On one hand, this is great news because you have many opportunities to grow your business. On the other hand, this is very challenging because you have two factors working against you: limited resources and a finite market size. Moreover, every change that you try will not work. This is why following a more scientific approach that includes forming hypotheses and measuring results is fundamental to growth science. Each experiment requires capital and human resources investment, and creating a well thought-out strategy and continually prioritizing experiments will be pivotal to your growth development efforts.

 

2.3.1 Brainstorm Growth Optimization Opportunities

As you begin to engineer your company’s growth, you will iteratively brainstorm new optimizations to try, create a strategy to guide your efforts, and constantly prioritize your growth experiments based on that strategy. Luckily, you have already created a framework that will help you to brainstorm and evaluate experiments. The customer journey map and growth model that you created will help guide your brainstorming. The journey map will highlight key actions in the customer interactions with your product and company, and can be juxtaposed with your growth model to understand how these actions affect overall customer and revenue growth.

Growth Strategy Cycle

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